Sorry Charlie’s: Take 1

June 7th, 2015 by Dresser Palmer House

Well, it’s June already! The hot weather is here and so starts a bit of a slow down in our world. SO, I decided it was time to venture out for dinner. Sorry Charlie’s is near City Market and with huge picture windows on 3 sides, it is a people watcher’s dream location to pick up a few drinks, maybe some oysters, and take it all in. We did just that…

Sorry Charlie’s in downtown Savannah was long vacant and was a staple in Savannah’s history. It was finally painstakingly renovated and restored and opened shortly after St. Pat’s weekend. I typically like to give restaurants a few months of open time to work out menu and service wrinkles before I try them. We were welcomed into the space, with a “rustic refined” coastal feel, by a friendly host that promptly seated us at a large bar-height table. The menu is simple, a one page clear and concise offering of fresh and fried seafood, raw oysters, unique starters, no frills salads, lovely looking blue crab stew, and some great looking inventive cocktails that all sounded fully leaded.

My party chose a dozen oysters on the half shell to start. For entrees we all decided (as unadventurous as it seems) to go with fried oyster Po’ Boys as a few had just passed by the table and caught our glares and salivating mouths with that cartoony quality like the steam from them had wandered over and turned our heads to attention.

We talked and peered out the giant walls of glass into Ellis Square’s crowds of families, lovers, and kids playing in the fountains under the setting sun and sipped on a few of the cocktails we had ordered. They were definitely potent and had our brains a little swimmy before our food arrived. The sandwiches arrived fairly quick like and were impressive portions. The bread was that perfect chewy, soft, and crispy roll just perfect for holding the plump fried fresh oysters, a few pickled okra, some spicy remoulade, and slaw. It was definitely one of the best Po’ boys I’d ever had, it was the perfect ratio of oyster to bread, and just saucy enough to coat them all in delicious heat. The fries were labeled as “crispy fries” and lived up to that name and included a drizzle of truffle oil and sea salt which made them an all but impossible to resist side.

What about our fresh oysters!?

That’s what we were thinking when the server abruptly came and apologized, explained that the tape in the order printer messed up and the kitchen had only received our entrée order. He stated that for the mess up they were taking care of our cocktails and dessert.

Dessert? HOW!? Well, my eyes trudged on to the menu once again and like a true glutton, I chose the bananas foster which was also divine and served atop a thick Belgian waffle.

In all, the great customer service, fun and relaxed atmosphere, and simple menu is a hit in my books. I’ll be sending guests there to do follow up missions very soon. I’m glad to have this building alive again especially with its perfect location and fresh offerings. Go check it out for yourself!

Savannah College of Art and Design Sidewalk Arts Festival

May 6th, 2014 by Dresser Palmer House

The Sidewalk Arts Festival was incredible this past weekend! Hundreds of artists came to decorate our beautiful Forsyth Park and only steps away from our front door. What could be better?! #SavannahCollegeofArtandDesign #arts #ForsythPark #outdoors #HistoricDistrict #events

SidewalkArtFestival05_JM12The Sidewalk Arts Festival was incredible this past weekend! Hundreds of artists came to decorate our beautiful Forsyth Park and only steps away from our front door. What could be better?! #SavannahCollegeofArtandDesign #arts #ForsythPark #outdoors #HistoricDistrict #events

Amazing Architectural Tour in Savannah

February 4th, 2014 by Dresser Palmer House

Savannah. is. GORGEOUS. We all know that. There are many factors that help her especially her amazing and varied architectural styles. Jonathan Stalcup, owner and sole tour guide of Architectural Savannah gives the MOST amazing architectural tour in Savannah.

Yesterday, the temperature was in the upper 70’s and it was absolutely beautiful to be able to get out about in the city (sorry northerners!) I had the chance, being friends with Jonathan, to sample his new route in the more central sections of the Historic District.2014-02-04 10.39.17

You think you know about the various styles and details in the buildings and homes ( mainly from watching HGTV and DIY networks) and Jonathan schools you at every turn. It’s great to have a professional guide that studied architecture at Savannah’s own SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) to lead you around and make you look UP. Gothic arches, marble quoins, Italianate porches, Greek revival pediments, Romanesque entryways, trefoil windows… I could go on and on.

Not only does he know his structural and design oriented details, he is a master at the historical knowledge of why and how these details were introduced, he knows the details about the lives of the famed architects that designed and the people that lived in these masterpieces. If you have a question, ANY question, about any building or style or architect, ask Jonathan and he either knows it or can easily find out from valid sources.

Stay with us at The Dresser Palmer House and I can most definitely get you in with Jonathan Stalcup for an amazing fact and design based tour of Savannah’s famed Historic District.

Vespa Scooters! Now is your chance!

February 1st, 2014 by Dresser Palmer House

It’s about to warm up! Have you ever passed the cool scooter shop ‪#‎Motorini‬ downtown on Drayton and thought about how fun it would be to zip around on one of those ‪#‎vespa‬ ‪#‎scooters‬?! Now is your chance! They have some really beautiful machines there that you need to take advantage of…photo (2)

With less than 300 in the United States, ‪#‎Savannah‬’s own #Motorini has one of the rare #Vespa 946’s on it showroom floor. Are you ready to come to Savannah and take it home? The Dresser Palmer House / An Historic Inn will give the lucky new owner a complimentary room night to explore the city with Italys most technologically advanced motor scooter to date.

Fun OUT of Historic District in Savannah.

January 28th, 2014 by Dresser Palmer House

Once in awhile, we DO get out of the #historicdistrict of #Savannah for a fun dinner. This time, a rainy Saturday brought me and a group of friends to #Habershamvillage, a small trendy neighborhood in #midtownsavannah. We decided on a great family casual place, The 5 Spot. The service was hilarious and attentive, the food was very hearty and filling for not much out of pocket. We shared a few appetizers, their collard and bacon DIP, yes, it was a delicious hot bubbly cheesy DIP with toasted pita points, and some chicken fingers. Then, as if that wasn’t enough gluttony, (forgot to mention my bloody mary), I also split an amazing burger with pepperjack cheese and bacon. Yes, I had bacon in two dishes… #don’tjudge.

Part Four: The Modern Age – History of Savannah, GA

November 30th, 2012 by Dresser Palmer House

The Fall of the Cotton Kings

Savannah marched its way into the Twentieth Century with its head held high. In addition to cotton, Savannah became the leading producer of naval stores, which included pine lumber, railroad ties, rosin, and turpentine. Exports from the Savannah seaport were said to be greater than all other Atlantic seaports’ combined. But, as the 1920’s roared in, so did the boll weevils which had been ravaging their way up through the Cotton Belt.

Georgia’s cotton industry was devastated, losing well over half of their 5.2 million acres in just ten years. As always, though, Savannah persevered, rising again to become a leader in both the paper-pulp and food-processing industries. The 1930’s welcomed the rise of large-scale operations like the Union Bag and Paper Company (now International Paper Company) and the Savannah Sugar Refinery (now Dixie Crystals), still in operation today.

The Military Style

As World War II pressed down on the nation, so did Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, which targeted the Southern states. Military training facilities were springing up at a consistent rate. Savannah answered the call of duty in its own fashion, by building thirty-six Liberty Ships in the Savannah River. These ships helped to transport troops and goods to both the European and Pacific theaters of war.

Near the close of the war, the Georgia Ports Authority had established operations on Savannah’s waterfront, steadily expanding trade with foreign nations. Meanwhile, Hunter Army Airfield was in development alongside the nearby Fort Stewart. These bases would become crucial to the magnitude of U.S. military power available during the Persian Gulf War.

Savannah’s Civil Rights Campaign

By 1950, Savannah’s African-American citizens comprised nearly fifty percent of the entire population, yet there was an unsettling divide between them and their white counterparts. The following decades saw numerous nonviolent protests headed by Mark Gilbert, the “father of the Savannah civil rights campaign” and leader of the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). His and his followers actions led way to the early-on integration of local law enforcement in Savannah, one of the first agencies to hire African-American officers in the South.

Savannah GA International Shipping Port

Savannah is one of the few cities in the United States in which citizens can proudly view their history right before their very own eyes. Regardless of the turbulent past, Savannah managed to remain relatively untouched. Little growth took place outside the historic and Victorian districts before the 1920’s, with much of present Savannah developed by the mid-1960’s.

Savannah remains, to this day, a bustling port city ranked among the top five busiest container shipping ports in the United States. The paper industry still prevails, while Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation has risen to be a world leader in the manufacturing of corporate aircraft.

Where shipping had previously succeeded, though, tourism now dominates in Savannah industry. When a city is so in-tune with its history as Savannah is, it isn’t hard to see why. The ever-growing efforts to research and preserve this American treasure has earned it a ranking among both the top ten of American and World City lists, truly fitting titles for the Hostess City of the South.

Thank you for staying tuned for our “History of Savannah, GA” blog series! We hope you enjoyed them. Click here is you missed part 1part 2, or part 3 of the History of Savannah, GA.

Experience the history of Savannah, book your stay at the Dresser Palmer House!

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